Tag: listening skills

10+ Things to do with a podcast in ELT

10+ Things to do with a podcast in ELT

In the EAP context I work in, we’ve recently had a drive to push engagement with authentic English-language input, within the classroom and as self-study. In general, as self-study I encourage my students to do whatever they enjoy doing – but do it in English! One of things a lot of students choose to do is to listen to podcasts.  They seem to like the fact that it doesn’t feel like ‘studying’. For me, though, this is a bit of a problem. My learners are pretty advanced, and I don’t feel they benefit as much as possible from podcasts if they simply ‘kick back’, relax, and enjoy listening. Of course the exposure is beneficial, but I found that students were not necessarily improving in their ability to use English actively. And so I came up with a list of tasks they could do to engage more actively with the podcasts they were listening to – and I’ve started doing some of them with students in classes, too. I’d like to share the ideas here as inspiration for other English learners and teachers. 

Please let me know if you try them out and how it goes! And let me know if you have other ideas I could add to my list!

Step one is, of course, choosing a podcast. I’d say that topic interest is a key factor here – if students are interested, they will put in the work to understand the content. Here are some sources of podcasts in English that I share with my students:

17850234-Vector-illustration-of-global-music-concept-with-shiny-earth-and-headphones-on-it-Stock-Vector.jpg

BBC Podcasts: http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts

NPR Podcast Directory: http://www.npr.org/rss/podcast/podcast_directory.php

Sky News Video Podcasting: http://news.sky.com/home/sky-news-video-podcasting/article/1208280

Podcasts Absolute Radio: http://www.absoluteradio.co.uk/podcasts/

CNN Audio and Video Podcasts: http://edition.cnn.com/services/podcasting/

 

And here are the tasks I allow them to choose from (in no particular order):

1) Reflect on the title of the podcast/episode. What do you expect to hear about? Look up any words you might expect to hear, if you don’t know them in English. Write down some questions and see if you can take notes on the podcast to answer them whilst listening.

2) Summarise the content of the podcast in 5-10 sentences. Don’t forget to use reporting language and name the source of the podcast.

2a) Make a spider diagram or flow-chart of the points covered in the podcast. What are the main points and what are the examples and explanations used to support them?

2b) Tell someone about the podcast’s content in your first language. Can you answer all of their questions about the topic? If not, listen again until you can.

English-English_and_English-Persian_dictionaries

3) Find words from the podcast that are new to you. For each word, make a note of the dictionary definition(s) from a monolingual English dictionary. Note any related words (e.g. adjective form, verb, nouns, etc.). Now find 3 synonyms that could be used in this context, and  1-2 antonym(s). Use a thesaurus to help you with this task. With this new vocabulary, rewrite the sentences from the podcast where the new words occured – using the synonyms and antonyms accurately in this context.

3a) Draw a mind-map of the key vocabulary used in the podcast. Look up words’ meanings, other word classes (e.g. nouns, adjectives, verbs, etc.), and also synonyms and antonyms to include. Try to write your own example sentences on the topic of the podcast using these sentences.

4) Find grammatical structures which are new to you or you would not actively use. (If nothing is new, take the first two clauses/sentences from the text.) Write out the structures and an explanation of why they are correct. See how many other ways you can reword the sentence to express the same information. Use a reference grammar book to help you with this task, e.g. Swan, M., Practical English Usage (Oxford: Oxford U.P., 2005).

5) Make up comprehension questions about the topic, and make an anwer key. You can swap with a friend to check you have both understood correctly.

6) Pick a statement from the podcast which you consider to be rather an opinion than a fact. Make a bullet-point list of points you could use to argue against this statement.

6a) Discuss the podcast’s content with a friend. Which points do you agree on and why? Where do you have different opinions? Can you convince each other of your opinions?

6b) Think about “so what?” – Now that you have learned something (hopefully!) from the podcast, what can you do with this knowledge? Does it connect to your studies? Does it make you want to change your behaviour or lifestyle?

7) Write a review of the podcast/episode. What did you like/not like and why? You might be able to post this as a comment on the podcast site and engage in a discussion with other listeners.

English_vowel_chart

8) Write the first sentence of the podcast in IPA symbols.

9) Find a section where the presenter speaks quickly, and try to transcribe exactly what they say. Reflect on how the words sound different when they are said alone and within the phrase/sentence.

9a) Use a programme such as VLC Player and make subtitles to accompany the podcast.

10) Write the reference for the podcast as if you had to include it in a bibliography.

 

 

 

Common problems with common listening tasks

Common problems with common listening tasks

Today, at the TEASIG / CRELLA conference in Luton, I had the pleasure of hearing two talks by Dr John Field. He was focussing on creating L2 listening tests, but a lot of what he said will be useful for those of us writing ELT listening materials for teaching, too! Based on what John talked about, then, here are some common problems to bear in mind when designing listening tasks.

Multiple Choice tasks

Here, the key is finding the magic balance between not making one of the answer options too obviously wrong (or right) and not having possible answers which are too close in meaning or overlap. We often see multiple choice questions where some of the answer options are not mutually exclusive, rely on very fine lexical/semantic distinctions (therefore testing vocabulary but not listening comprehension!), can be answered from general knowledge of the world (therefore not requiring learners to understand the listening text!), or use language more sophisticated than that in the listening text we’re trying to check comprehension of! In listening tasks for lower levels, another danger is that learners may be encouraged to listen out for specific words but may not understand the overall message of the audio input, especially if the possible answers consist of only one word each.  And sometimes it seems attempts to make listening tasks harder/higher level just result in longer answer options to choose from – but this simply increases the load on learners’ working memory whilst they’re listening, therefore making it more of a memory test than one of listening comprehension.

Gap Fill Tasks

What makes this task type hard is that it makes multiple simultaneous demands on the learners, as they have to read, listen and write at the same time. Not having the right answer(s) may then be a result of this mixed demands processing, rather than a lack of comprehension. Likewise, having the right answer does not necessarily signify true comprehension of the lisening text, as learners could simply fill in the word they (think they) hear, even without knowing what it means in this context.

Multiple Matching Tasks

This kind of matching task, e.g. identify the speaker who…., can be difficult for learners to cope with when used with listening texts. This is mainly because they usually involve audio texts of conversations with several speakers, whose voices and ways of speaking the learners then have to distinguish/recognise and adjust to – in the worst case, we may end up testing voice recognition skills rather than listening comprehension! Also, if there are the same number of items in both lists to be matched up, getting one pair wrong automatically means another pair is wrong. John also warned against getting too creative with names of speakers, as lower level learners might not recognise these words as names, but mistake them for unfamiliar vocabulary items!

True / False Tasks

The most obvious argument against using this type of task is that learners have a 50% chance of answering correctly, even without understanding a word of the listening text! Some task designers add in a “not mentioned” option to decrease these odds, but listening for something that is not there is quite a tricky task! Also, there is sometimes a pretty fine line between ‘false’ and ‘not mentioned’. Interestingly, research has shown that people are more likely to tick ‘true’ than ‘false’ when given this choice (something about human nature?), so to try to ensure a learner’s good result on such a task is due to actual comprehension, it might be better to include more items where the correct answer is ‘false’.

General comments

Overall, John recommends designing listening tasks based on the actual audio, not just the transcript. This may be one way to help make sure our tasks actually test listening, and not other skills or aspects of language. Also, the focus should remain on listening, and so we need to avoid tasks which cloud the water by requiring complex reading skills at the same time, for example. Of course, the task types desribed above can be effective in checking listening comprehension and providing ‘diagnoses’ of learners’ listening difficulties, but we need to bear these potential pitfalls and problems in mind when designing them and take care to keep our tasks aligned with the learning goals of the lesson.