Tag: EAP

10+ Things to do with a podcast in ELT

10+ Things to do with a podcast in ELT

In the EAP context I work in, we've recently had a drive to push engagement with authentic English-language input, within the classroom and as self-study. In general, as self-study I encourage my students to do whatever they enjoy doing – but do it in English! One of things a lot of students choose to do … Continue reading 10+ Things to do with a podcast in ELT

My LTSIG Talk: Using Multimodal Learner-Driven Feedback to Provide Sustainable Feedback on L2 Writing

My LTSIG Talk: Using Multimodal Learner-Driven Feedback to Provide Sustainable Feedback on L2 Writing

Time for a little advertising! 😉 On October Thursday 5th October at 4.25pm UK time, I'll be giving an online talk as part of the LTSIG /OllREN online conference and would be delighted to see you there! Exploring efficient ways to give sustainable feedback on L2 writing is important because providing meticulous correction of language … Continue reading My LTSIG Talk: Using Multimodal Learner-Driven Feedback to Provide Sustainable Feedback on L2 Writing

Academic Writing Skills & “Just in Time” Teaching

Academic Writing Skills & “Just in Time” Teaching

I've been looking back over my notes from IATEFL 2017 to find inspiration for another blog post. I'm a bit late now to just summarise talks, but I'd like to come back to one of the questions that was posed at a talk I attended. It was "Building bridges: the disciplines, the normative and the … Continue reading Academic Writing Skills & “Just in Time” Teaching

Showing students what makes good dictionaries good

Showing students what makes good dictionaries good

Jennifer Macdonald's post "Friends don’t let friends use bad dictionaries" was an inspiration! It’s an issue that frustrates me every semester anew! As I posted as a comment on Jennifer's post, last term, I even made the (joke) rule that if someone uses dict.cc or leo.org (translating tool thingies for German – English) on their phone or … Continue reading Showing students what makes good dictionaries good